Subchapter H. Minimum Standard Rule Revisions that May Affect Compliance

Caring for Infants

747.2319 Are there specific requirements for feeding infants?

In addition to replacing the terms "child" and "children" with "infant" and "infants", this rule has been amended to clarify that bottles cannot be propped or supported by an object. The images below show instances of propping, none of which are allowed.

Bottle Propping

Bottle Propper

Bottle Propper

 

Furnishings and Equipment

747.2305 What furnishings and equipment must I have in the infant care area?

This rule has been amended to:

• replace the term "children" with "infants";

• clarify that cribs are to sleep in; and

• specify that cribs are required for non-walking infants younger than 12 months of age.

 

How is this different?

Instead of requiring a crib for each non-walking infant (0-17 months), cribs will be required for non-walking infants younger than 12 months of age.

Read the following scenarios and select those that require a crib.

[mark all correct answers]

 
 
 
 
 

 

Booster Seat

747.2307 Must the equipment I use for infants be equipped with safety straps?

This rule has been amended to specify that if the manufacturer requires safety straps on a chair, swing, stroller, infant carrier, bouncer seat, or similar type of equipment, then the safety straps must be fastened whenever a child is using the equipment.

 

What does this mean?

If any equipment you use at your child care home includes safety straps, the safety straps must be fastened whenever a child is using the equipment; however, any equipment you use in your child care home that does not require safety straps is acceptable and should be used as instructed by the manufacturer.

 

Can I choose to purchase or make safety straps for equipment that does not have them?

No. You should not attempt to purchase or create safety straps for equipment unless specifically required by the manufacturer.

Similarly, if straps break, you cannot fix them on your own. The equipment is no longer usable if it comes with straps that are no longer functioning as intended.

 

If any piece of infant equipment comes with safety straps, the safety straps must be fastened whenever an infant is using the equipment.

 
 

 

According to 747.2307, which of the following answer options is an acceptable reason for not fastening safety straps when using infant equipment?

 
 
 

 

747.2309 What specific safety requirements must my cribs meet?

In addition to replacing the term "child" with "infant", this rule has been amended to:

• clarify that this rule applies to all full-size and non-full-size cribs;

• incorporate information regarding "port-a-cribs" (which are "non-full-size" cribs as defined by CPSC);

• clarify that cribs must be labeled with the infant's name; and

• add the requirement that only mattresses designed specifically for use with the crib model type may be used.

For full-size, non-full-size and stackable cribs, the mattress you use with the crib must meet manufacturer specifications. The image below shows an example of a manufacturer's guide. Notice that this manufacturer identifies their product as CPSC certified and outlines the dimension requirements for mattresses used with this crib model.

Crib Manufacturer Specifications

 

Play Yard

747.2311 Are play yards allowed?

In addition to changing the rule question (formerly Are mesh cribs or port-a-cribs allowed?), this rule has been amended to:

• remove content specific to "port-a-cribs" because these cribs must meet all of the requirements in 747.2309 What specific safety requirements must my cribs meet?;

• add the term "play yard", which are mesh or fabric sided cribs;

• specify that play yards must be used according to the manufacturer's instructions, including the cleaning of the play yard:

• specify that play yards must have a firm, flat mattress that snugly fits the sides of the play yard, the mattress must be designed by the manufacturer specifically for the play yard model number that is being used and the mattress must not be supplemented with additional foam material or pads; and

• specify that play yard sheets must be designed specifically for the size and type of play yard and play yard mattress that it is being used, be tight fitting and thin and not be designed to make the sleep surface softer.

 

Are non-full-size cribs and play yards the same?

No. This is why non-full-size cribs, which include port-a-cribs, will no longer be a part of this rule. The purpose is to distinguish the difference between non-full-size cribs, like port-a-cribs, from play yards. If it has mesh sides it is a play yard.

 

747.2313 Are stacking wall cribs allowed?

In addition to replacing the term "child" with "infant" and modifying wording for easier readability, this rule has been amended to clarify that stacking wall cribs are allowed only for infants who cannot stand or infants who are able to stand without hitting their heads on either the top of the crib or the ceiling above the top crib.

 

Technical Assistance: Stacking cribs are most useful for younger infants who are not exploring mobility, which increases the likelihood of accidentally bumping their heads from attempts to pull up. Also consider the size and weight of the infant in the top crib in relation to the height and physical abilities of your caregivers.

Stacking Crib

 

A Guide to Crib Types

Full-Size

Non-Full-Size

Stackable

Play Yard

Characteristics

• May or may not have wheels

• May or may not be collapsible

• Hard sides

• May or may not have wheels

• May or may not be collapsible

• Hard sides

• May be a non-traditional shape (oval)

• May be full-size or non-full-size

• Two cribs stacked one on top of the other

• Wheels on lower crib

• Hard sides

• May be used for sleep only or may be used for a combination of sleep and exploration

• Mesh sides

• May or may not have wheels

• Collapsible and portable

Distinguishing Features

Interior dimensions of 28 5/8 inches in width and 52 2/3 inches in length

Larger or smaller than full-size crib dimensions

Two cribs stacked one on top of the other

mesh sides, foldable

Also Known As

"standard"

"port-a-crib", "mini", "portable"

"stacking", "double decker", "bunkie", "space saver"

"playard", "play pen", pack n' play"

 

747.2315 What specific types of equipment am I prohibited from using with infants?

This rule has been amended to specify that cribs must be bare when occupied by an infant younger than 12 months of age with exception to a crib mattress cover that is designed specifically for the size and type of crib and crib mattress, be tight fitting and thin and not be designed to make the sleep surface softer.

 

What does it mean to be bare?

Bare means the crib should be free of any additional items, including those soft bedding items previously listed in the rule—soft, loose bedding, blankets, sleep positioning devices, stuffed toys, quilts, pillows, bumper pads and comforters.

 

How is this different?

The intention of the rule is the same. The language of the rule has been updated to more accurately reflect the intent, which is to ensure cribs occupied by infants younger than 12 months of age are bare or free of any additional items, including those soft bedding items previously listed in the rule—soft, loose bedding, blankets, sleep positioning devices, stuffed toys, quilts, pillows, bumper pads and comforters.

 

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Infant Safe Sleep

747.2326 May I allow infants to sleep in a restrictive device?

This new rule has been added to clarify that infants are not allowed to sleep in restrictive devices unless Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, is completed by a health-care professional stating that sleeping in a restrictive device is medically necessary. If an infant falls asleep in a restrictive device, the infant must be removed from the device and placed in a crib as soon as possible.

747.2327 Are infants required to sleep on their backs?

In addition to replacing "child" with "infant" and clarifying that infants must sleep in their own cribs, this rule has been amended to clarify that infants not yet able to turn over must be placed in a face-up sleeping position unless Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, is completed by a health-care professional stating a different sleeping position is medically necessary..

747.2328 May I swaddle an infant to help the infant sleep?

This rule has been amended to clarify that swaddling is only allowed if Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, is completed by a health-care professional stating that swaddling a specific child for sleeping purposes is medically necessary.

Alert

 

Your licensing inspector has just entered your home for an inspection.

For which of the following scenarios might your inspector cite minimum standard rule 747.2326 May I allow infants to sleep in restrictive devices?.

[mark all correct answers]

 
 
 

 

If a parent requests a sleeping position for their infant that is not allowed by minimum standard rules, what should I tell the parent?

 If a parent requests her infant be placed in a sleeping position or in a device that is not allowed by minimum standard rules, your operation must inform the parent of the requirement to have their infant's health care professional complete Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, based on the infants medical need. Once the parent brings the completed sleep exception form, you can review it to ensure it is complete. Once you and the infant's caregiver sign the Infant Sleep Exception Form, the sleep exception will be allowed within the time frame outlined by the health care practitioner.

 

What is the Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710? Where can I obtain a copy?

The Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, is a new form created to serve as the written medical statement from a health-care professional required for exceptions to the three rules above, which outline infant sleep requirements.You can access this form on the DFPS Internet.

 

Do I have to accept and allow Infant Sleep Exceptions?

No. Your child care home may choose whether Infant Sleep Exceptions will be allowed. In addition, your child care home can choose whether to accept infant sleep exceptions on an individual basis.

You just received a completed Infant Sleep Exception from Nicole's dad. After reviewing the exception and considering Nicole's health and sleeping patterns, you determine that the risk outweighs the benefits and decide not to sign and allow the sleep exception.

Are you allowed to decide whether to accept an Infant Sleep Exception from the infant's health-care professional?

 
 

You have received Infant Sleep Exception, Form 2710, from Ben's parents, which has been completed by Ben's health-care professional.

The form indicates that the sleep exception can begin immediately and can remain effective for two weeks.

At the end of the two week period, Ben's parents feel that Ben would benefit from extending the exception for an additional week, so you decide to continue following the recommendations on the sleep exception that just ended.

Is this an acceptable practice?

 
 

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