CCDBG Rule Changes
Emergency Preparedness

Welcome!

Child Care Blocks

This presentation is designed to help you become familiar with Texas Child Care Licensing minimum standard rule changes resulting from the Child Care Development Block Grant (CCDBG). This presentation includes information and scenarios in the form of questions. Your answers will not be graded or tracked. The questions are designed to serve as a learning tool.

Timer Icon

Approximately 10 minutes

 

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness

Who is affected?

Overview

As part of the initiative to enhance health and safety in child care, the Child Care Development Block Grant addresses emergency preparedness in amended and new rule requirements. The table below summarizes the new requirements for each affected minimum standard rule chapter.

Summary of Changes

What is an emergency preparedness plan?

P. 744.3551

- adds requirement to include plans to address relocation to an alternate shelter location

- adds requirement to include plans to address emergency lock-down inside the operation

W. 746.5201

W. 747.5001

What must the plan include?

P. 744.3553(D) & (F)(4)(5)

- adds staff responsibility of orderly movement to lock-down location

- adds inclusion of how staff will continue to care for children until release

- adds inclusion of how staff will reunify children with parents/guardians following emergency

W. 746.5202(C) & (F)(4)(5)

W. 747.5003(D) & (F)(4)(5)

Practice Drill Requirements

P. 744.3559(2)(3)

- changes requirement to practice severe weather sheltering drills to be conducted at least 4 times in a calendar year (instead of every 3 months)

- adds requirement to practice new lock-down drills at least 4 times in a calendar year

W. 746.5205(2)(3)

W. 747.5005(2)(3)

Diagram

P. 744.3561(b)

- adds that plan must be in view of children and caregivers

W. 746.5207(b)

747 -

- no requirement

 

Rule: What is an emergency preparedness plan?

Emergency Preparedness Plan

In addition to minimum standard rule requirements to plan for emergency evacuations, the rule requirements for child care homes and centers (chapters 744, 746 & 747) have been amended for emergency preparedness plans to include specifications of emergency relocation and emergency lock-downs.

There are four types of emergency responses you are required to address in your plan

TYPE

WHEN

WHERE

Evacuation

Immediate situation rendering inside of building unsafe; safety can be sought outdoors (example: fire)

Designated location outside of the operation

Relocation

Imminent situation rendering inside and outside of building unsafe (example: flooding)

Designated location away from the operation

Sheltering

Immediate or imminent situation rendering partial areas of indoor space unsafe and leaving or exiting the operation unsafe (example: tornado)

Designated location within the operation

Lock-Down

Immediate or imminent situation rendering partial areas of indoor space unsafe and leaving or exiting the operation unsafe (example: endangering person on premises or in area)

Designated location within the operation

Technical Assistance: As you create your procedures for preparedness, consider the types of emergencies your operation may be at greater risk to experience. Are you in a floodplain? Is your operation situated at a lower elevation (e.g. downhill)? Are you in an area that experiences tornadoes? Is your building well-maintained? Does your operation use gas?

Technical Assistance: To stay informed of emergencies that may impact you, consider signing up for Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), which will include the agency issuing the alert, the type and time of the alert and any action you should take. Visit ready.gov for more information about Wireless Emergency Alerts.

 

  

 

 Consider This!

Technical Assistance: For emergency situations, especially those requiring critical decision-making, it is best practice to contact your local fire department to inform them of your current situation, options and plans. Authorities can help you determine which action may be the safest.

 

What should I consider when choosing the lock-down location in my operation?

There are two types of lock-downs: when there is a dangerous person inside your operation and when there is a dangerous person in your operation's area. How you respond will depend on which type of lock-down situation you are experiencing.

Danger inside the operation

Danger in the area outside of the operation

 Consider This!

 

Rule: What must my emergency preparedness plan include?

Check List

Minimum standard rules for child care centers and homes (chapters 744, 746 & 747) specify the requirement for emergency preparedness plans to include staff responsibility in a sheltering or lock-down emergency for the orderly movement of children to a designated location within in center where children should gather.

In addition, rules now require emergency preparedness plans to include how staff will continue to care for children until each child is released and how your operation will reunify children with their parents as the evacuation, relocation or sheltering, or lock-down is lifted.

Specifying how staff will continue to care for children until release

The intent of this requirement is to ensure each operation has a plan to care for children once the evacuation, relocation or lock-down is in place. Often, we focus on getting to safety, which is the first priority, but just as important is ensuring each child's needs are met throughout the emergency. Take a look at the question below to see what should be included.

Consider This!

Technical Assistance: If you are relocating to a city building that is not set up for children, consider having a "go box" with has simple activities, books and crafts to keep children occupied during the transition.

 

Specifying how you will reunite children with parents following emergency

The intent of this requirement is to ensure you, your employees and parents understand how contact will be made during an emergency as well as how your operation will reunify each child with his or her parent following the emergency. Review the three examples below to learn more about how this requirement may be addressed in your emergency preparedness plan.

 Example 1

 Example 2

 Example 3

Technical Assistance: Consider developing more efficient means of communication by creating an email and phone distribution list. This allows notification to be sent to all parents and guardians simultaneously via email and text message. You may also want to consider a messaging service such as a Remind.

 

Rule: Must I practice my emergency preparedness plan?

Practice Drill

Minimum standard rules for child care centers and homes (chapters 744, 746 & 747) have amended practice drill requirements.

Fire drills are still required to be performed once a month; however, requirements for severe weather sheltering drills have been amended from requiring practice once every three months to four times in a calendar year.

In addition, child care operations are now required to practice lock-down drills for endangering persons four times in a calendar year.

Consider This!

Technical Assistance:For drills to be the most successful, it is best to conduct them at different times of the day and the year. Spacing the drills will increase the likelihood of a successful emergency lock-down and ensure all employees have had the opportunity to participate in the drills at regular intervals.

Consider This!

 

Rule: Must I have an emergency evacuation and relocation diagram?

Evacuation Diagram

Minimum standard rules for child care centers (chapters 744 & 746) have been amended to specify the location of the emergency evacuation and relocation diagram be posted near the entrance and exits of each room children use and must be easily viewed by children and employees.

 Consider This!

Technical Assistance: It is best practice to only label the emergency evacuation, severe weather sheltering and relocation diagrams. Specifying the lock-down location on the emergency evacuation and relocation diagram may allow the opportunity for a dangerous person to locate children and employees in a lock-down location.

 

 

Wrap Up

Points to Remember

Think Prepare Act

  • Make sure your emergency preparedness plan addresses relocation to an alternate shelter location and emergency lock-downs.
  • Make sure your emergency preparedness plan includes staff responsibility of orderly movement of children to a designated lock-down location, addresses how your operation plans to provide continual care for children during an emergency and addresses how your operation will reunite children with their parents following an emergency.
  • Your operation is now required to practice severe weather sheltering drills at least four times in a calendar year and lock-down drills at least four times in a calendar year.
  • For child care centers (chapters 744 and 746), you must ensure your emergency diagrams are posted in view of children and caregivers.

These minimum standard rule amendments were published 9/1/2016 and are currently in effect. All day care operations will receive technical assistance surrounding compliance with these amendments until 3/1/2017.

Additional Resources

FEMA - Multihazard Planning for Child Care

2 hour web-based course that covers preparation and plan development

REMIND - Communication Service

Learn how it works

Virtual Lab School – Preparing for Emergencies

Guidance, video demonstrations and job aids

Texas AgriLife Extension Services - Family and Consumer Sciences

Child care training resources

You're finished! We hope this review has helped you become familiar with the Child Care Development Block Grant emergency preparedness requirements. You can close your browser or use the menu at the top of the page to take another look at material reviewed in this presentation.