CCDBG Rule Changes
Handling, Storage and Disposal of Hazardous Materials

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Child Care Blocks

This presentation is designed to help you become familiar with Texas Child Care Licensing minimum standard rule changes resulting from the Child Care Development Block Grant (CCDBG). This presentation includes information and scenarios in the form of questions. Your answers will not be graded or tracked. The questions are designed to serve as a learning tool.

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Approximately 10 minutes

 

Handling, Storage and Disposal of Hazardous Materials

Germs

Who is affected?

Overview

As part of the initiative to enhance health and safety in child care, the Child Care Development Block Grant addresses handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials in new rule requirements. The table below summarizes the new requirements for each affected minimum standard rule chapter. As you review the summary of changes, notice how the requirements are the same for each affect minimum standard rule chapter.

Summary of Changes

Steps to ensure a healthy environment

K. 744.2507(11)

- adds using, storing and disposing of hazardous materials as outlined by the product manufacturer

R. 746.3407(13)

R. 747.3203(13)

Wearing gloves when handling blood

K. 744.2523(2)

- adds requirement to follow CDC guidelines

- adds requirement to place blood contaminated gloves in sealed plastic bag

- specifies washing hands with soap and water

R. 746.3425(2)

R. 747.3221(2)

Diaper changing

744 -

- no requirement

R. 746.3505(g)

- adds requirement that soiled clothing be placed in a sealed plastic bag to be sent home with the child

R. 747.3307(f)

 

Rule: What steps must I take to ensure a healthy environment?

Cleaning Supplies

Minimum standard rules for child care homes and centers (chapters 744, 746 & 747) now specify the requirement to use, store and dispose of hazardous materials following the manufacturer's instructions.

This specification applies to the use of all commercial cleaning products.

So what guidelines should operations follow?

Read the label first. Each cleaning product has instructions for proper use and precautions printed on the label that tell you important facts, like the following:

Cleaning Product Label

> The types of surfaces for which it can be applied and how to apply the product to a surface.

> How long you need to leave it on the surface to be effective (contact time).

> If the surface needs to be cleaned first and rinsed after use.

> Whether the product requires preparation, like dilution with water, before use.

> Precautions you should take when applying the product, such as necessary ventilation, types of contact to avoid and what to do in case of improper contact.

 

Also look for storage and disposal specifications. Many product labels will include storage instructions, like temperature and proximity to other products.

If a product label does not include disposal instructions and you want to make sure you are disposing of the product safely, a simple Internet search can identify the proper procedures for ensuring safe disposal.

 

 Technical Assistance: For additional guidelines for safe disposal of hazardous materials, check out EPA guidelines for hazardous waste.

 

 Consider This!

 

Rule: Must caregivers wear gloves when handling blood or bodily fluids containing blood?

Disposable Gloves

Minimum standard rules for child care centers and homes (chapters 744, 746 & 747) require caregivers to wear disposable, nonporous gloves when handling blood or bodily fluids containing blood. This means caregivers must wear disposable, nonporous gloves any time they are providing direct care or clean up for an illness or injury that exposes blood.

 

In addition, disposable, nonporous gloves used when handling blood or bodily fluids containing blood must be disposed of in a secure manner. Specifically, minimum standard rules require contaminated gloves be placed in a tied, sealed or otherwise closed plastic bag and discarded immediately.

 Wearing gloves will only be effective when done properly. Consider the following best practices when using disposable gloves.

Click here to view a short video demonstrating proper techniques for putting on and taking off disposable gloves.

Technical Assistance: When purchasing disposable gloves make sure your caregivers and enrolled children do not have a latex allergy.

  

Consider This!

 

Rule: What must I do to prevent the spread of germs when diapering children?

Girl Washing Hands

Children who are learning to use the toilet may still soil their pull-ups or underwear and clothing. Minimum standard rules for child care centers and homes (chapters 746 & 747) now require soiled clothing to be safely stored in a sealed plastic bag to be sent home with the child. The intent of this rule is to decrease the risk of spreading infection by preventing contamination.

Cloth Diaper

 

How should soiled clothing be handled prior to placement in a sealed plastic bag?

Soiled clothing should be placed directly in the plastic bag. To avoid contamination of otherwise clean surfaces that are routinely used by children and caregivers, soiled clothing should not be rinsed in the sink or toilet prior to placement in a sealed plastic bag. If clothing is soiled with solid fecal matter, the fecal matter can be carefully disposed in and flushed down the toilet.

 Consider This!

Technical Assistance: If these procedures are new to your operation, consider sending a newsletter to parents explaining the new procedures and asking parents who have children still learning to use the toilet to provide an extra set of clothing.

What is considered a "sealed" plastic bag?

We now know that minimum standard rules require soiled clothing and blood contaminated disposable gloves be stored in a sealed plastic bag. The intention of these requirements is to create an additional barrier to decrease the possibility of direct and indirect contact with hazardous substances and materials. So what is considered a "sealed" plastic bag?

Ways to seal a plastic bag:

Examples of Sealed Plastic Bags

Technical Assistance: Consider repurposing clean plastic bags you have already used from groceries and produce.

 

Wrap Up

Points to Remember

First Aid

  • Follow product manufacturer's instructions for the use, storage and disposal of cleaners and other potentially hazardous products.
  • Ensure disposable gloves contaminated with blood are placed in a sealed plastic bag prior to discarding them.
  • Ensure soiled clothing is placed directly in a sealed plastic bag to be sent home with the child. Do not rinse soiled clothing in the sink or toilet prior to placement in a sealed plastic bag.

 

These minimum standard rule amendments were published 9/1/2016 and are currently in effect. All day care operations will receive technical assistance surrounding compliance with these amendments until 3/1/2017.

Additional Resources

Administration of Children and Families – Hazardous Materials Brief

Access for further explanation about the background and purpose of associated new rule requirements

Virtual Lab School – Safe Environments

Access for guidance, video demonstrations and job aids

You're finished! We hope this review has helped you become familiar with the Child Care Development Block Grant requirements surrounding the handling, storage and disposal of hazardous materials. You can close your browser or use the menu at the top of the page to take another look at material reviewed in this presentation.