smiling group of tweens on a playground

What We Do

The FAYS program addresses family conflict and everyday struggles while promoting strong families and youth resilience. Every FAYS provider offers one-on-one coaching or counseling with a trained professional and group-based learning for youth and parents. FAYS programs also operate a 24-hour hotline for families having urgent needs.

Who We Serve

Families with youth under 18 years old who are dealing with family conflict or every day struggles. In some areas of the state, FAYS only provides services to families with children 6-17 years of age.

Download the FAYS brochure:

Map of Providers and Communities

Map of Texas, showing providers across the state. For a text version of FAYS providers, check the PEI Provider Directory.

*Denotes Texas Kinship Navigator Program Grantees
For additional provider details, see the Fiscal Year 2021 PEI Provider Directory.

How We Measure Success

  • Children remain safe during services, within 1 year (99.3% in FY20) and 3 years (90.3% in FY20).
  • Percentage of youth not referred to juvenile probation (94% in FY20).
  • Increase in protective factors, such as family functioning and resiliency, social supports, and nurturing/attachment (88% of caregivers in FY20).

Program Data

  • Program Start Date: 2014
  • Target Number of Youth/Families Served Annually, FY22: 1,314
  • Average Number of Youth/ Families Served Per Month, FY21: 337
  • Counties Served: All Counties
  • Annual Budget for Community Contracts: $24,821,446
  • Total Number of Community Grantees: 28 Grantees, 7 Subgrantees
  • Average Grantee Budget: $365,000

FAYS Success Story

Buckner International (Rio Grande Valley)

Jay, a 16-year-old high school student, was referred to FAYS by his high school guidance counselor. The family and Jay expressed having issues communicating with one another, specifically on issues regarding Jay’s school attendance and academic performance. Jay expressed to his FAYS case manager that his self-esteem was at an all-time low and he feared he was going nowhere in life.

Their case manager utilized the “It’s All About Being a Teen” handbook to discuss and work through a variety of topics with Jay, including but not limited to anger management, communication, problem solving, and healthy decision making. Additionally, the case manager worked with the entire family to develop stronger communication skills.

After three months of participating in the FAYS program Jay began to attend school on a regular basis as well as completing his assignments. Jay and his family began communicating more openly about his goals for the future, and increased their connection as well as overall happiness with one another.

In May, Jay graduated from high school with the rest of his classmates, a milestone he expressed being very proud of. He is now working at a local restaurant while taking virtual welding classes at Texas State Technical College.