<<Previous Page

Next Page>>

1120 Guiding Principles of the CPS Program

1121 Family Group Decision-Making (FGDM)

CPS September 2015

Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) is a collaborative approach to service planning and decision making. Using the FGDM approach, CPS invites the child or youth and his or her family to join CPS staff in developing a service plan. DFPS recognizes that the best results are obtained when the child or youth and family is involved in making decisions that affect safety, permanency, and well-being.

The goal for families is to increase family participation in this collaborative approach with CPS in making decisions about their safety and service plans and to engage the extended family members, and other members of the family’s support system, in this process.

Collaboration strengthens the ability of extended family members and other supportive persons to provide safe and permanent living arrangements for the family’s children and youth.

The goal for older youth is to increase their involvement in developing their service plans and developing their transition plans as they age out of care.

Staying involved helps youth reaffirm or identify caring family and adult relationships and support systems.

1121.1 The FGDM Philosophy

CPS September 2015

Family Group Decision Making:

  •  recognizes that families possess the information needed to make well-informed decisions and are responsible for their children’s security and sense of belonging;

  •  emphasizes developing a partnership between families, DFPS, and other departments and agencies that serve them, so that service planning and decision-making become a collaborative process;

  •  respects families, children, and youth and helps them decide what services they need, based on their strengths and resources, to meet the needs of the children or youth and ensure their safety;

  •  emphasizes the family’s responsibility to care for and to provide a sense of identity for their children;

  •  encourages families to connect with the resources available in their communities and provides a means for communities to support families;

  •  encourages families to participate voluntarily in meetings that are family-centered, culturally relevant, community-based, and oriented to the families’ protective capacities; and

  •  provides a supportive environment in which families can discuss their needs and concerns.

1121.2 Using Models of FGDM to Guide Safety and Service Planning

CPS September 2015

CPS uses the following models of FGDM to guide safety and service planning. The FGDM models are used to varying degrees, as appropriate:

1121.21 Family Team Meeting (FTM)

CPS September 2015

Family Team Meetings generally are held before a child is removed from the home, but may also be held during other stages of service, such as when a family receives Family Based Safety Services or when a child is in DFPS conservatorship.

Family Team Meetings enable DFPS to:

  •  provide a quick, family-involved response to concerns about the child’s safety or placement; and

  •  achieve positive results for the child during the earliest stages of CPS interaction with the family.

See Appendix 1121: Documentation Requirements for Models of Family Group Decision Making Documentation

1121.22 Family Group Conference (FGC)

CPS September 2015

A Family Group Conference involves a higher degree of coordination and long-term service planning than a Family Team Meeting. Family Group Conferences generally are held after a child is removed, but may also be used before removal when the family receives Family Based Safety Services.

During a FGC, the child’s family joins with relatives, friends, and community members to develop a plan for the child and family. The purpose of the plan is to address specific concerns and ensure that the child is cared for and protected from future harm. The group identifies service providers (such as schools, churches, and counselors) and then works with the providers and CPS staff to help the family meet the goals of the plan, provided that the plan adequately addresses the specified concerns.

See:

6251 Overview of Permanency Planning Meetings

Appendix 1121: Documentation Requirements for Models of Family Group Decision Making

1121.23 Circle of Support (COS)

CPS September 2015

A Circle of Support conference is held soon after a youth who has been removed from the home reaches age 14. The COS is directed by the youth and focuses on the youth.

Although a COS may be used for various purposes, the primary purpose is to:

  •  develop a transition plan for older youth who are moving from foster care to adulthood; and

  •  connect the youth to supportive and caring adults who can help when the youth ages out of care.

A COS includes broad participation by members of the youth’s support network.

See:

6252 Permanency Planning Meetings for Youth 14 and Over

Appendix 1121: Documentation Requirements for Models of Family Group Decision Making

1121.24 Transition Plan Meeting (TPM)

CPS September 2015

A Transition Plan Meeting is held soon after a youth who has been removed from the home reaches age 14. A TPM tends to be a shorter and more DFPS-driven conference with fewer participants than a Circle of Support. A TPM is used as an alternative to the COS when youth do not desire a COS, or a COS cannot be convened.

See:

6252 Permanency Planning Meetings for Youth 14 and Over

Appendix 1121: Documentation Requirements for Models of Family Group Decision Making

1121.25 Permanency Conference (PC)

CPS September 2015

A Permanency Conference is held when it is not possible or appropriate to hold a Family Group Conference.

A PC is held for a child or youth in DFPS conservatorship for the purposes of:

  •  developing or reviewing the child’s or youth’s permanency plan;

  •  developing or reviewing the family service plan;

  •  resolving barriers to achieving a permanent living arrangement, as appropriate; and

  •  developing and reviewing the transition plan for youth age 14 and 15.

Family Group Decision Making strategies are used, to the extent possible and appropriate to the situation.

See:

6251 Overview of Permanency Planning Meetings

Appendix 1121: Documentation Requirements for Models of Family Group Decision Making

1121.3 Family Group Decision-Making Strategies

CPS September 2015

The safety and service planning models include the use of some or all of the following FGDM strategies:

  •  Meetings are attended by children, their families, other persons in their support system, and relevant community members.

  •  Trained facilitators skilled in FGDM philosophy and strategies conduct meetings in all of the models of safety and service planning. Some models use co-facilitators.

  •  Independent facilitators coordinate and facilitate FGDM meetings. Their objectivity helps to ensure a fair process, gain a family’s willingness to participate in the process, and enhance the family’s ability to trust a system that they may view with suspicion.

  •  Meetings for older youth are attended by the youth, adults and other persons that youth identify as their family or supportive persons. The meetings are also an opportunity to introduce or reconnect the youth to people who may provide support in the future.

  •  The timing and location of the meetings suit the needs of the family and older youth, when possible.

  •  Cultural uniqueness is acknowledged.

  •  Safety and service planning models and FGDM strategies are selected based on what is appropriate to the situation.

For additional information on the CPS safety and service planning models that incorporate FGDM strategies, see:

6251 Overview of Permanency Planning Meetings

1121.4 The Attendance and Participation of Children and Youth in FGDM Conferences

CPS September 2015

The inclusion of the child’s or youth’s voice in the decision making and planning about his or her safety, well-being, and permanency is critical to achieving positive results for children, youth, and families. Children and youth, therefore, must be given an opportunity to attend and participate in Family Group Decision Making conferences (FTM, FGC, COS, PC, TPM).

Although a child’s or youth’s attendance at a meeting or conference is never forced, the child’s or youth’s worker must make every effort to include the child or youth in the meeting or conference. If a child or youth cannot or chooses not to attend in person, the worker provides the child or youth with alternate methods of participation.

1121.41 Alternate Methods of Participation for Children

CPS September 2015

If a child or youth is unable to attend a conference in person, the worker may ask the child or youth to express his or her thoughts about safety, the current placement, the CPS services received, and the goal for permanency by either:

  •  writing them down in a letter to be read at the conference;

  •  drawing them in a picture to be shown at the conference;

  •  verbalizing them in a video or audiotape to be played at the conference; or

  •  verbalizing them to a designated supportive adult, such as a family member or friend, to be addressed at the conference.

The worker may also allow the child to:

  •  attend only part of the conference;

  •  attend by conference call or SCAN call; or

  •  attend by video conference, if available.

1121.42 Alternate Methods of Participation for Older Youth

CPS September 2015

Older youth are strongly encouraged to attend their Family Group Decision Making Conference, unless they decline.

If the youth declines to attend, the worker:

  •  ascertains the reason for the decline;

  •  ensures that the youth fully understands the purpose of the conference; and

  •  ensures that the youth understands the importance of having a voice in planning for their future.

The worker must try to accommodate the schedule of the youth, whenever possible. If the youth cannot attend, the youth may represent himself or herself at the meeting by conference call, SCAN call, videotape, audiotape, or letter.

The worker must hold a follow-up discussion with the youth, regardless of how the youth plans to participate in the conference, to ensure that the youth is aware of and understands the planning and decision-making that will be made on his or her behalf.

1122 Focus on Resources and Outcomes

CPS December 2007

CPS seeks to ensure the safety of children and to promote the integrity and stability of families. To maintain this focus, CPS identifies and matches three key elements:

  •  Desired Outcomes: The specific changes in client circumstances and behaviors that will best protect the child and strengthen the family.

  •  Critical Success Factors: The CPS activities that, if done well, are most likely to achieve these changes.

  •  Resources: The staff and material needed to carry out these activities.

Desired outcomes, critical success factors, and necessary resources vary according to the needs of clients, and the needs of clients change over the course of receiving services. To address the changing needs of different clients over time, CPS correlates resources, activities, and outcomes by stages of service.

1123 Stages of Service

CPS 96-8

Management Policy

CPS defines each stage of service in terms of agency activities and client outcomes. The definitions constitute a framework for identifying what our clients need, specifying services and allocating resources to meet their needs, and assessing our performance in terms of the difference we make in their lives.

Each major section of the handbook will correspond to one or more stages of service, and will open with a description of desired outcomes — the specific changes in client circumstances and behavior that will best protect the child and strengthen the family at that stage of service.

Each major section of the handbook will also include detailed specifications of the amounts and types of service most likely to achieve these changes and of the staff and material resources needed to deliver such services.

1124 Definition of Stages of Service

CPS 2000-2

1. Intake (INT)

The intake stage begins with the receipt of a written or spoken report of any kind. The report may or may not contain information about child abuse or neglect.

Services include:

  •  receiving the report;

  •  determining whether the report involves child abuse or neglect;

  •  determining the urgency of response;

  •  checking CPS records;

  •  discussing the report with the supervisor;

  •  notifying law enforcement, if required by Chapter 261, TFC;

  •  making referrals to other resources when appropriate; and

  •  completing appropriate documentation.

Ends with the following decision which is approved by the supervisor when necessary to classify it as:

  •  an abuse/neglect intake and subsequently close it in the intake stage or progress it into the investigation stage;

  •  a special request (administrative or casework related) and close it or assign it for services;

  •  an I&R and assign it or close it without assignment.

Abuse/Neglect Intakes

The abuse/neglect intake stage will show a stage type after assignment or approval occurs. The stage types for abuse/neglect intake and investigation stages are an abbreviation of the primary allegation, plus the priority (which is chosen at the conclusion of the intake). Examples of stage types for intake include, but are not limited to:

  •  ABAN1;

  •  ABAN2;

  •  ABANN;

  •  EMAB1;

  •  EMAB2; and

  •  EMABN.

Note: The stage types that end with "N" are closed without assignment.

The intake stage can be assigned to field staff, who can then assign the intake a new priority, close it without assignment, or progress it to the investigation stage.

Special Request Intakes

During recording of the intake request, the user can choose "special request" as the type of CPS intake. These are requests for service that do not include allegations of abuse/neglect, but require greater staff activity than an I&R call. After approval and assignment of the intake, the special request is categorized into one of two distinct groups:

  •  special request (SPC), which is a stage; or

  •  casework-related special request (CRSR), which is a stage type.

The special requests that are categorized as "special requests" after closing the intake are those requests of an administrative nature, such as agency statistics, records checks, or presentations, etc. These move into their own stage (SPC). They can be assigned to staff, but do not have a case name and cannot progress into any other stage of service. These are requests of an administrative nature and do not involve casework services for clients.

The special requests categorized as "casework-related special requests (CRSR)" are requests for services for non-abuse/neglect clients. These CRSRs resemble regular cases in that they have a case name and can be assigned to other staff. A CRSR will show up in CAPS as a stage type, not a stage of service. They can be progressed into the stage of service in which the user needs to gain access to the Task List. Casework-related special requests involve casework activities, such as conducting a home study, providing court-ordered services, or providing ICPC services.

Listed below are the special requests available during intake, including how they are categorized after approval and assignment.

Special Requests (Administrative)

  •  agency statistics;

  •  information packets;

  •  locating assistance/alerts;

  •  records checks;

  •  requests for expertise, such as requests by law enforcement for help with casework interviews; and

  •  requests for presentation.

Casework-Related Special Requests (CRSRs)

  •  adoption service requests;

  •  court-ordered requests;

  •  ICPC requests;

  •  pre-delinquent child report;

  •  request for local public service;

  •  request-out of state;

  •  TYC (request to certify IV-E eligibility); (Note, though TYC has now become part of Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD), the TYC terminology will continue regarding this item under CRSRs).;

  •  JPC (request to certify IV-E eligibility) (Note, though JPC has now become part of Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD), the JPC terminology will continue regarding this item under CRSRs); and

  •  PAL (request for a former CPS child who had not previously received PAL services).

Information and Referral

Begins with the receipt of a request for information that does not involve a:

  •  report of abuse or neglect, or

  •  request for service delivery.

This stage cannot progress to any other stage. Examples of I&R calls include, but are not limited to:

  •  calls on existing cases;

  •  requests for community services;

  •  calls in which the reporter refuses to make a report; or

  •  requests to view or modify records.

2. Investigation/Initial Assessment (INV)

The investigation stage includes stage types identical to those in intake, a combination of the primary allegation, plus the priority. The stage type in investigation is determined in intake and is static throughout the investigation stage.

Investigation stage begins with the decision to investigate a report.

Services include

  •  assessing the risk to the child;

  •  immediate provision of protective services to ensure the child's safety during and after the investigation, which may include removal;

  •  interviews with children, parents, alleged perpetrators, and collateral contacts;

  •  examinations of the child, including medical, psychological, and psychiatric examinations;

  •  home visits; and

  •  completion of appropriate documentation to close the case or to provide continuing services.

Ends with

  •  a disposition for each allegation;

  •  assessment of the risk of mistreatment; and

  •  the supervisor's decision to provide further protective services or close the case.

Casework-Related Special Requests (CRSR) may be transferred into the investigation stage in order to access the investigation task list in CAPS. These are services to non-abuse/neglect clients. They begin with assignment to a staff person and end with supervisory approval of closure or transfer to another stage. A case that is in the investigation stage as a CRSR type cannot become an abuse/neglect investigation case. If abuse or neglect is discovered during a CRSR, a new intake alleging abuse/neglect or risk is recorded within the Intake stage and then assigned as an investigation if appropriate. The CRSR would need to be closed when the requested services have been delivered. If during service delivery on a CRSR a conservatorship removal is recorded, CAPS will automatically open a child's substitute care case, and a family substitute care case. A conservatorship removal occurs when DFPS either has legal conservatorship or intends to obtain legal conservatorship of a child in order to place in out of home care. The CRSR in the investigation stage should be closed after documentation is completed.

Cross-reference: See Section 2200 Basic Investigation Process, for more information about the investigation services.

3. Family Preservation (FPR)

The family preservation stage includes services to families to prevent removal of children from the home. The family preservation stage cannot be opened until the investigation stage is concluded.

The family preservation stage has six stage types:

1.   Regular: (formally known as in-home services) includes support to the family to prevent removal of children at risk of abuse/neglect.

2.   Moderate: includes moderate support to the family to prevent removal of children at risk of abuse/neglect.

3.   Intensive: includes intensive support to families at high risk of abuse/neglect in order to prevent removal of children from the family.

4.   Contracted Regular: includes services to support families to prevent removal of children when the service is provided by a contracted agency or individual.

5.   Contracted Moderate: includes moderate services to support families to prevent removal of children when the service is provided by a contracted agency or individual.

6.   Contracted Intensive: includes intensive services to families to prevent removal of children when the service is provided by a contracted agency or individual.

A case can change stage types within the family preservation stage. For example, a family preservation regular case can become a family preservation intensive case. The reverse is also true.

Begins with the decision to open a case for family preservation services after

  •  the investigation conclusion confirms that risk of future mistreatment is indicated, and

  •  CPS determines that the child's safety can be ensured in the home.

Services include

  •  assessing the family for strengths and identifying areas where improvement is needed;

  •  developing a family plan that (i) identifies the child's and the family's needs, and (ii) specifies the services CPS must provide or purchase, as well as the actions the family must take, to meet these needs;

  •  carrying out the services and actions specified in the family plan;

  •  reviewing and revising the family plan whenever necessary; and

  •  maintaining regular contact with the child and the family.

Ends when

  •  services are terminated and the case is closed, or

  •  a conservatorship removal is recorded on any child in the family preservation case (which opens substitute care and family substitute care stages) and the family preservation stage is subsequently closed.

Cross-reference: See Section 3000, Family Based Safety Services, for more information about the family preservation stage.

4A. Substitute Care (SUB)

The substitute care stage is a child-specific stage for a child in the managing conservatorship of DFPS who has been removed from his or her own home.

Begins with the recording of a conservatorship removal of a child.

Conservatorship removal is recorded when DFPS removes a child from the care, custody, and control of his or her family due to risk of abuse/neglect and DFPS has obtained or plans to obtain legal conservatorship of the child.

Services include

  •  selecting an appropriate substitute care provider;

  •  developing and carrying out a child case plan to document information such as the permanency goal, the target date for achieving the goal, the estimated length of stay in substitute care, the child's needs, and the services planned to meet those needs during the child's stay in substitute care;

  •  working with the substitute-care provider or with the relatives providing substitute care in order to meet the child's needs during the placement; and

  •  providing information to the court of continuing jurisdiction.

Ends when

  •  the user records that a child was returned to his or her own home, (own home is defined as the home of any biological parent or legal parent, or the home from which the removal occurred) further work with the child can be documented in the open family stage (FSU or FRE);

  •  parental rights have been terminated and the child has been placed in an adoptive home;

  •  a child has been placed permanently with a relative, conservatorship has been transferred to the relative, and services are no longer needed;

      Note: If services to the relative or to the children placed with the relative are to continue after the relative has been given conservatorship of those children, leave the oldest child's (who is placed with the relative) SUB stage open, close the SUB stage of any other children placed with that relative, and record efforts with the relative and children in the oldest child's record.

  •  the youth becomes emancipated, turns 18 years old, or dies; and no further services need to be provided on behalf of the youth; or

      Note: The stage may stay open to finish documenting services.

  •  For youth staying in care past their 18th birthday, the stage ends when they finish their vocational program (must finish before turning 19) or when they finish their high school program (must finish before turning 20); if the youth finishes high school, the stage can stay open up to an additional 3 months if the youth plans on entering college.

The substitute care stage can never progress into the family preservation stage. When children in the substitute care stage are reunited with their family, their substitute care stage is closed. Subsequent case recording regarding the child is entered into the family substitute care stage or the family reunification stage.

If the family reunification stage has not been opened manually, recording of return home as the reason for removal from the last substitute care placement for the last child in substitute care will automatically open the family reunification stage. The family substitute care stage may be subsequently closed when case documentation for the stage is complete.

Cross-references:

See Section 6000, Substitute-Care Services, for more detailed information.

4B. Family Substitute Care (FSU)

Begins with the recording of a conservatorship removal of a child. CAPS automatically opens a family substitute care case when the user records the removal in the conservatorship removal window.

Services include:

  •  developing a family plan that (i) identifies the family's strengths, needs and resources, and (ii) specifies the services CPS must provide or purchase, as well as the actions the family must take;

  •  planning and coordinating a family visitation plan; and

  •  working with the child and the family toward achievement of the permanency goal.

Ends when:

  •  parental rights have been terminated on all children in substitute care;

  •  no children remain in substitute care;

  •  DFPS no longer has legal responsibility for any of the children in the family;

  •  DFPS has permanent managing conservatorship of the children without termination of parental rights, and there are no longer plans to continue working with the family towards the return of the children;

  •  the user has progressed the stage to family reunification and subsequently closed the family substitute care stage; or

  •  the last child in the substitute care stage in the case becomes emancipated, turns 18 years old (see exceptions in Section 10000), has a guardian appointed, becomes an APS client, has disabilities of a minor removed, or dies.

      Note: For children with an open Substitute Care stage, the Family Substitute Care stage once closed may be reopened if there are new plans to try and reunite the children with the family. The stage is reopened by using the Options menu item on the Case Summary window.

Cross-reference: See Section 6000, Substitute-Care Services, for more detailed information.

5. Family Reunification (FRE)

Family reunification can only occur after a case has been in the family substitute care stage. A family reunification stage includes the parent or caregivers and all children in the home. The substitute care child's stage is closed after recording a placement removal reason of "child returned to own home." After the child's substitute care stage is closed, case recording regarding the child is entered into the family stage.

Begins when the placement removal reason of "child returned own home" is used and there are no other substitute care stages open in the case. (Own home is defined as the home of any biological parent or legal parent, or the home from which the removal occurred.) This stage can also be selected by the supervisor when an appropriate exception to the above exists. (For example, there is one child in the case still in the substitute care stage, but parental rights are terminated and there is no plan for family reunification.) A new family reunification stage has a stage type of regular. The stage type can be changed, if appropriate, by the primary worker or supervisor.

Services include assistance to the children and family to stabilize the return, reduce the risk to the children, and prevent future removals.

There are six stage types in family reunification. Stage types are identical for family preservation and family reunification.

1.   Regular: includes support to the family to prevent re-removal of children from the family.

2.   Moderate: includes moderate support to the family to prevent re-removal of children from the family.

3.   Intensive: includes intensive support to families at high risk of abuse/neglect in order to prevent re-removal of children from the family.

4.   Contracted Moderate: includes moderate services to support families to prevent re-removal of children when the service is provided by a contracted agency or individual.

The other two contracted types: Contracted regular and contracted intensive services are not currently available. They are for future use.

Ends when

  •  services are no longer needed to stabilize the return and protect children from abuse or neglect, and DFPS's conservatorship is terminated; or

  •  a child is again removed from the home.

6. Adoption (ADO)

Begins when the user opens the Adoption stage from the Stage Progression window. Manually opening the Adoption stage is necessary in order to record the planned adoption placement in the Adoption stage. If the planned placement does not occur, the user closes the Adoption stage with the closure reason "Planned placement did not occur."

When the planned placement occurs, the user ends the last substitute care placement with a placement removal reason of "Adoptive Placement." In the Adoption stage the user changes the "planned" placement to "actual." The substitute care stage should be subsequently closed when all documentation for the stage is complete.

Services include

  •  placing the child with an adoptive family;

  •  developing an adoption service plan;

  •  post-placement supervision of the adoption placement;

  •  assisting the adoptive family and their attorney in the completion of the adoption consummation process; and

  •  financial assistance, when applicable (examples: an adoption subsidy, reimbursement of non-recurring adoption expenses).

Ends when

  •  the adoption is consummated and the case is closed;

  •  the adoption disrupts, and the child is returned to substitute care. Note: This will not reopen the substitute care stage;

  •  the permanency goal is changed from adoption to transfer of conservatorship to the child's caregiver; or

  •  the child becomes emancipated, turns 18 years old, or dies before adoption consummation.

Cross-reference: See Section 6900 Adoption Preparation and Support Services for more detailed information about the adoption stage.

7. Post Adoption (PAD)

When the user closes an adoption stage with a closure reason of "Adoption consummated," CAPS creates a new case in the name of the adoptive home, and creates a new post-adopt stage in the case for each adopted child. The post-adopt stage begins automatically if there was an open subsidy in the adoption stage at stage closure. If there was not an open subsidy in the adoption stage when it was closed, the new case with the post-adopt stage is created by CAPS and then closed. If post-adopt services are requested later, the closed case is re-opened.

Other Stages

Administrative Review for Investigation (ARI)

Begins with the request for an administrative review or a release hearing.

ARI stage can be opened only if the Investigation stage is closed and by a user with the appropriate security attribute. If the previous allegation dispositions are overturned, the new dispositions can be entered by a user assigned to the ARI stage. Once the ARI stage is closed, it can be viewed but not modified.

Ends with the decision about the review or hearing and closure of the stage.

Cross-reference: See Item 1260, Administrative Review of Investigative Findings, and Item 1290, Release Hearings.

Foster and Adoptive Home Development (FAD)

Begins with the receipt of an inquiry about providing foster or adoptive parenting services to children in the conservatorship of DFPS.

Services include screening, training, and study of appropriate candidates. Continued support, training of certified homes, and matching of homes with children needing placement is also included.

Ends with

  •  the denial of certification, or withdraw from the DFPS program and case closure.

  •  consummation of the adoption and subsequent closure of the Adoptive home.

There are no stage types for the FAD stage. No other case or stage can be progressed to or from a FAD stage. FAD stages cannot be merged with other cases.

Cross-reference: Section 7000, Foster and Adoptive Home Development.

Administrative Review for Foster or Adoptive Home Providers (ARF)

Begins with the receipt of a request for review of an adverse action taken by DFPS toward a FAD provider.

Ends with the conclusion of the review and the recording of the decision.

ARF stage can be opened if the FAD stage is open or closed by a user with the appropriate security attribute.

Cross-reference: Section 7000, Foster and Adoptive Home Development.

Note: Most post-adopt services are provided through contracted providers.

Services include:

  •  adoption subsidy,

  •  information and referral,

  •  case management and service planning,

  •  parent groups,

  •  therapeutic counseling services,

  •  respite care,

  •  residential placement services, and

  •  24-hour crisis intervention.

Ends when all adoption subsidy, contracted, or non-contracted services are closed.

Cross-reference: See Item 6960 Postadoption Services, for more detailed description of post-adopt services.

8. Preparation for Adult Living (PAL)

PAL services are provided to youth in substitute care to prepare them to live independently when they become adults. The PAL stage can be opened for any youth who is currently or has been previously in the substitute-care stage and who meets the age requirements (at least 14 years old.) The PAL stage may begin, in individual situations and with available state funds, for any child who is at least 14 years or older, in a case that is in the following stages:

  •  family preservation;

  •  family sub-care;

  •  family reunification; or

  •  adoption.

For a youth who has previously received substitute care services, but who has never received PAL services, a new casework-related special request in the intake stage recorded as a request for PAL services can be progressed into the PAL stage in order to open the appropriate CAPS windows.

Begins automatically for any child in the substitute-care stage who is 15½ years old.

Services include:

  •  initial assessment,

  •  training in fundamental skills an adult needs to live independently,

  •  case planning,

  •  transitional living allowance,

  •  household supplies stipend, and

  •  optional PAL services.

Ends when the PAL coordinator closes the stage because services are no longer provided. After closure, the PAL stage can be re-opened when a new request for PAL services is received. The PAL stage must be closed for any child age 21 or older.

Cross-reference: See 10200, Preparation for Adult Living (PAL), and 10000 Services to Older Youth in Care, for more detailed information on preparation for adult living (PAL) stage.

<<Previous Page

Next Page>>