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6300 Services to Families

6310 Services to the Child’s Family When the Child Is in Substitute Care

CPS February 2017

After a child is placed in substitute care, services to the child’s family vary depending on the status of the case.

This section discusses the family services that are provided when:

  •  Family Reunification is one of the permanency goals (see 6312 Services to the Parents When Family Reunification Is the Permanency Goal);

  •  CPS obtains permanent managing conservatorship without termination of parental rights (see 6360 When CPS Obtains Permanent Managing Conservatorship Without Termination of Parental Rights); or

  •  CPS obtains permanent managing conservatorship with termination of parental rights and is working with the parent(s) for PMC.

Generally, CPS no longer provides a family plan of service if parental rights have been terminated. The only exception is if parental rights have been terminated and the permanency plan changes to reunification with a parent.

See 6600 Case Planning with Relatives and Other Kinship Caregivers.

6311 Participation of Parents’ Attorneys When a Child Is in Substitute Care

CPS February 2017

Staff must invite the parents’ attorneys to all formal meetings CPS convenes to address aspects of the parent’s case and to which the parent is invited to participate. This includes, as appropriate:

  •   a case staffing to develop a family plan of service;

  •  a case staffing to discuss parent services;

  •  a family group conference;

  •  a permanency conference;

  •  a mediation;

  •  a case staffing to plan for the discharge and return of the child to the parent; and

  •  any other case staffing that CPS determines would be appropriate for the parent to attend.

This does not apply to any internal CPS staffing or meetings between CPS and the CPS attorney.

Texas Family Code §107.0131

If the attorney does not attend, the meeting may proceed as scheduled, unless the attorney specifically advises that the meeting cannot be held with the parent without the attorney’s presence.

6312 Services to the Parent When Family Reunification Is the Permanency Goal

CPS February 2017

When the permanency goal is Family Reunification, the caseworker must work with the family to reduce the risk of abuse or neglect so that the child may return home and live safely for the foreseeable future.

To do this, the caseworker must:

  •  assess the family’s functioning, by identifying family strengths and needs, to understand the issues that have placed the child at risk;

  •  assist the family with developing a safety network to provide safety and support to the child;

  •  use the results of the Family Strengths and Needs Assessment (FSNA) to engage the family to develop the family service plan as specified in 6242 The Family Plan of Service and 6330 The Family Strengths and Needs Assessment (FSNA);

  •  arrange parent-child visitation. See 6416 Visitation between Families and Children in Substitute Care;

  •  ensure that the family receives the services specified in the Family Service Plan, within the limits of available resources and under CPS’ authority under the law;

  •  ensure that the initial services are scheduled no later than the 21st day after the child entered care; and

  •  document the efforts to help the family pursue reunification.

See:

6234.1 Family Reunification

6241 The Child’s Service Plan

1251 Clients With Communication Disabilities

1250 Clients With Limited English Proficiency (LEP)

6313 Contact with the Family

CPS February 2017

Monthly visits must focus on resolving abuse or neglect issues that resulted in one or more children being removed from the home. The visits must focus on gathering enough information and assessing the parent’s needs and strengths to ensure the safety, permanency, and well-being of each child. Monthly visits also give the caseworker an opportunity to address case planning and service delivery.

Frequency of Contact

The caseworker must maintain face-to-face contact with each of the child’s parents at least monthly, to address case planning and service needs. More frequent contact may be needed, depending on the issues in the case. The supervisor will determine the frequency at which face-to-face contacts must occur in the parent’s residence based on the circumstances and permanency plan for the case.

The caseworker must maintain monthly face-to-face contact with the children who remain at home after a sibling has been placed in substitute care and the case is in temporary legal status. If a sibling is in a parental child safety placement (PCSP), this child is still considered a member of the home and must be visited monthly.

For more information see 3210 Parental Child Safety Placement (PCSP) and the Parental Child Safety (PCSP) Resource Guide.

If a parent is incarcerated, the supervisor may waive the required face-to-face visits but the caseworker must maintain monthly contact with the parent and continue working with the parent towards identified goals in the family plan of services.

6314 Services to Children and Parents Across Regional Lines

CPS February 2017

When a child, youth or family resides outside of the region that holds legal jurisdiction (the “legal region”), the requirements for making monthly contact and providing services to child and parent remain the same as those in:

6400 Services to Children in Substitute Care

6300 Services to Families

6312 Services to the Parent When Family Reunification Is the Permanency Goal

If one or more parents resides outside of the child’s legal region, the caseworker must request courtesy supervision within two days of learning about the parent’s location. See 6413 Services to Children and Caregivers Across Regional Lines.

CPS must provide courtesy supervision when a child or youth in conservatorship is placed outside of the region that has legal jurisdiction and is residing with a parent. See 6314.1 Coordination between Primary Caseworker and Courtesy Supervision Caseworker.

CPS can request Local Permanency supervision when a child or youth in conservatorship is placed outside of the region that has legal jurisdiction but not with a parent.

See 6414 Local Permanency Supervision and its subitems.

6314.1 Coordination Between Primary Caseworker and Courtesy Supervision Caseworker

CPS February 2017

Courtesy supervision does not relieve the primary caseworker of his or her responsibilities to the parent or the child.

Before the courtesy caseworker’s first visit with the parent (or the parent and child, if residing together), the primary caseworker and the courtesy caseworker must have a phone conference to discuss:

  •  the plan of service;

  •  any specific court orders;

  •  family and sibling visitation;

  •  special issues;

  •  the permanency plan for the child or youth; and

  •  a communication plan.

The communication plan will address how information and documents will be shared between the primary caseworker and the courtesy caseworker. The plan should specifically address how they will share information around the development and review of:

  •  court reports;

  •  plans of service;

  •  appropriateness of placement; and

  •  permanency goals.

6314.11 Courtesy Caseworker Responsibilities

CPS August 2017

The courtesy caseworker must:

  •   visit the parent (or the parent and the child, if residing together), within 15 calendar days of being assigned secondary in IMPACT;

  •   conduct well planned monthly visits to assess progress in achieving service plan goals;

  •   ensure services identified in the service plans and any court orders are set up and provided for the parent and the child;

  •   report any unmet needs to the primary caseworker;

  •   discuss the child’s permanency plan with the child or youth and parent during every visit, to assess progress being made to achieve that goal;

  •   document:

  •   any face-to-face contact with the child on the same day of the contact and enter the completed narrative no later than seven calendar days from the contact;

  •   all other contacts as soon as possible, but no later than seven calendar days;

  •   communicate, at least monthly either verbally or via email, with the child or youth’s primary caseworker to provide information to assist in completing service plans and court reports; and

  •   participate in and assist the primary caseworker with coordinating Permanency Planning Meetings.

6314.12 Primary Caseworker Responsibilities

CPS February 2017

When working with a courtesy supervision case, the primary caseworker must:

  •  maintain at least monthly contact with the parent (and the child if residing with the parent) via email, telephone contact or other forms of technology;

  •  maintain at least monthly contact with the courtesy caseworker to ensure that all of the needs of the parent and child are met as outlined in 6400 Services to Children in Substitute Care and 6300 Services to Families, and to keep the courtesy caseworker informed of any significant changes in the case; and

  •  submit updated court reports to the courtesy caseworker five days before a court hearing, and submit any court orders to the courtesy caseworker within five business days after the court hearing to ensure that consistent information is being provided to the family.

6320 Conducting Visits with the Family

6321 Preparing for the Visit

CPS February 2017

To prepare for the monthly visit the caseworker must:

  •  review the Family Service Plan for expectations and progress;

  •  contact service providers to review progress;

  •  review any other notes or materials necessary to be familiar with the child’s current needs and situation; and

  •  review any information that may need to be provided to the family.

6322 Conducting the Visit

CPS February 2017

The caseworker must talk with each child and parent separately and together. The separate conversations are important as they allow the child or parents to bring up concerns that they might not share in front of others.

During the monthly or more frequent visits, the child’s caseworker must discuss with the child and parents the progress in addressing the Family Service Plan since the last visit. The caseworker asks them about what has gone well, what are the problems or difficulties, and how have they handled these. The caseworker asks them about their use of family and community support and resources, as needed. The caseworker reviews expectations and progress in addressing the Family Service Plan.

During the Visit with the Child

During the visit with each child, the child’s caseworker must ask about and discuss the:

  •  child’s safety;

  •  child’s thoughts and feelings about living with the family;

  •  child’s interactions with other children in the home;

  •  child’s understanding of why CPS is involved with the family;

  •  child’s school situation; and

  •  services that have been provided.

During the Visit With the Parent

During the visit with the parent, the child’s caseworker must ask about and discusses the parent’s:

  •  thoughts and feelings about having the child in care returned;

  •  thoughts and feelings about caring for children that may still be in  the home;

  •  contact and visits with the child in care and determines if the visitation plan should be expanded or reduced;

  •  progress in addressing the issues and expectations in the Family Service Plan;

  •  use of family and community resources and support systems;

  •  difficulties, if any, in completing Family Service Plan requirements and any assistance or services that the CPS might provide that could help them complete those requirements; and

  •  desire to make any needed changes in the Family Service Plan.

The caseworker helps the child and parent with adjustment issues as needed. The caseworker observes the interaction of the parent and child.

6323 Assessing the Visit

CPS February 2017

Both during and after a visit with a child or family, the caseworker must assess:

  •  the parent’s ability, willingness, and effort to address the issues identified in the Family Service Plan that might lead to the child in care being returned to the parent;

  •  the safety of the children that may be in the home;

  •  the parent’s interaction with any children that may be in the home;

  •  the parent’s ability, willingness and efforts to care for such children in the home and meet their needs, particularly safety needs; and

  •  the children’s progress and ability to protect themselves.

6324 Documenting the Visit

CPS February 2017

After each contact, the caseworker must document observations of and discussions with the parent and children. See 6133.2 Documenting Contacts in Substitute Care.

6325 Following Up

CPS February 2017

As follow-up to the monthly visit, the caseworker must:

  •  ensure that any identified needs of the child are addressed;

  •  ensure that any identified needs of the family are addressed; and

  •  revise the service plan as needed.

6330 The Family Strengths and Needs Assessment (FSNA)

CPS February 2017

The caseworker must complete the Family Strengths and Needs Assessment (FSNA) by the 21st day from the date of removal. The caseworker must meet with the parent before completing the FSNA.

The caseworker must complete an FSNA on a parent, unless:

  •  the parent’s whereabouts are unknown;

  •  the court has ordered aggravated circumstances; or

  •  the child in care meets criteria of a Baby Moses case and the parents are unknown. See 2351 Baby Moses.

The caseworker must complete an FSNA within 30 days of locating a parent whose whereabouts were previously unknown.

The caseworker must send the FSNA to Star Health by the 21st day after removal. In order to ensure information from the FSNA and Child Adolescent Needs and Strengths Assessment (CANS) is available for the caseworker to use in service planning, the caseworker must follow the process outlined in the Comprehensive Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) 2.0 Resource Guide under How to Fax the FSNA to Superior Health.

See:

6431 Initial Assessment Services

6250 Permanency Planning Meetings

6242.3 Requirement for a Family Plan of Service

6340 Completing the Family Plan of Service

CPS February 2017

The caseworker completes a Family Plan of Service, following all requirements in 6242 The Family Plan of Service (FPOS) and its subitems.

6350 Contact with Special Populations

6351 Incarcerated Parents

CPS February 2017

Although a parent who is incarcerated may not be able to participate fully in his or her child’s case, the parent must be:

  •  notified of any court hearings or legal actions that will be taken regarding his or her child;

  •  interviewed to gather information to fully assess the family;

  •  provided with information about the child;

  •  provided with appropriate services (to the extent available); and

  •  included in case planning as appropriate.

See the Incarcerated Parents Resource Guide for guidelines on:

  •  locating incarcerated parents;

  •  visiting an incarceration facility;

  •  engaging an incarcerated parent; and

  •  facilitating contact between a child and an incarcerated parent.

Locating an Incarcerated Parent

When trying to locate a parent, staff must follow the policy in 5220 Due Diligence and Service of a Citation.

Engaging an Incarcerated Parent

Incarcerated parents must be involved in case planning and receive a copy of their child’s and their own plan of service, as well as be updated about the case on a regular basis.

All correspondence to the incarcerated parent must be sent via certified mail.

Contact Between a Child and an Incarcerated Parent

When determining contact between the child and the incarcerated parent, the caseworker must consult with his or her supervisor to determine if the child’s safety, permanency and well-being are assured, depending on the reason the parent is incarcerated. The caseworker and supervisor must consider the following issues in determining contact arrangements between the child and the incarcerated parent:

  •  type of contact (face-to-face, letter, telephone, video conferencing, photo sharing);

  •  the child’s desire to have contact with the incarcerated parent;

  •  whether the crime the parent committed has an impact on the child’s safety;

  •  whether the crime the parent committed has an impact on the child’s well-being; and

  •  the impact visiting an incarceration facility may have on the child versus the impact of not visiting. For example, some children are so worried about their parents that seeing them, even through a glass barrier, allays their concerns and reduces anxiety.

If the reason for the parent’s incarceration is due to abuse of the child, and the parent has not been convicted, the caseworker and supervisor must discuss any contact with the prosecuting attorney, attorney representing DFPS, child’s attorney, and CASA if appointed. If the parent has been convicted, the caseworker checks with the incarceration facility to see if there are any restrictions.

If any concerns arise after contact has been initiated between the child and the incarcerated parent, the caseworker must consult his or her supervisor to determine if any changes are needed.

6352 Military Families

CPS August 2017

Federal law prevents any party, including DFPS, from obtaining a default judgment against a person while the person is serving in the military.

Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, 50 USC Appendix §§501-538

If a parent’s whereabouts are unknown at the time of the status hearing, the caseworker must take the following steps to find out whether the missing parent has any connection to the military, and document those steps as detailed below.

If the caseworker does not complete the steps at the time of the Status Hearing, the caseworker must complete the steps before DFPS can obtain a final order by default against a parent.

1.   The caseworker must interview family members or other persons who have information about the missing parent to obtain any information about the parent’s possible military service, including current or previous military service. The caseworker must record this information on Form 2068 Affidavit Regarding Military Service. See Appendix 5223.4: Making a Detailed Diligent Search for a Parent.

2.   The caseworker must request a Certificate of Service or Non-Service from the U.S. military’s data center. To do so, the caseworker goes to the Service members Civil Relief Act (SCRA) website and chooses Single Record Request. (If the message There is a problem with this website’s security certificate appears, scrolls down to select Continue to this website (not recommended). The caseworker enters the following information in the fields:

  •   the individual’s first and last names; and

  •   the individual’s birth year or Social Security number.

3.   The caseworker must print the Certificate of Service or Non-Service and submit it to the court with Form 2068 Affidavit Regarding Military Service.

      The caseworker must request a manual search if:

  •   information is missing;

  •   the response is inconclusive; or

  •   the caseworker has information that conflicts with the result of the Web search. For example, staff may be aware that the parent is in fact in the military, but this is not reflected in the search results.

      The caseworker requests a manual search by sending a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the address below and including as much identifying information as possible about the person who is the subject of the search.

Defense Manpower Data Center

Attention: Military Verification

1600 Wilson Blvd., Suite 400

Arlington, VA 22209-2593

      If necessary, the caseworker may also contact the data center as follows:

Telephone: (703) 696-6762 or 5790

Fax: (703) 696-4156

4.   If the search produces a Certificate of Service for the parent, the caseworker must alert the attorney representing DFPS immediately. The court will stay (suspend) the proceedings because an attorney appointed for a military service member can neither:

  •   waive any of the parent’s rights; nor

  •   bind the parent (constrain the parent through legal authority). 

5.   If the search produces a Certificate of Non-Service, the caseworker must provide the Affidavit of Military Service and Certificate of Non-Service to the attorney representing DFPS.

When a Parent Is Deployed

If a caseworker discovers that a parent has been or is likely to be deployed, the caseworker must ask what arrangements have been made to designate a caregiver for the child during the service member’s absence. The arrangement may be informal or may be a formal designation of a caregiver with court approval, as provided in Texas Family Code Chapter 153, Subchapter L.

Whether the agreement is informal or formal, the caseworker must:

  •   document in IMPACT any designation by a parent of a caregiver; and

  •   inform the attorney representing DFPS.

6360 When CPS Obtains Permanent Managing Conservatorship Without Termination of Parental Rights

CPS February 2017

Although CPS may be named as the permanent managing conservator, CPS must continue efforts toward achieving positive permanency for every child and youth. Specifically, staff must:

  •  ensure that any services provided following the final order comply with specific provisions of the final order and are reflected in the FPOS. The court may, in the final order, provide for child support, visitation, possessory conservatorship, or other rights, duties, and services, all of which should be reflected in the Family Plan of Service (FPOS) and CPS actions in the case;

  •  conduct a review of the case within 30 days of the final order and revise the FPOS within 45 days of the final order.

  •  assess the parents’ involvement in the case;

  •  actively pursue services until:

  •  CPS is no longer permanent managing conservator;

  •  parental rights are terminated; or

  •  the determination is made that services can be discontinued in accordance with 6363 Reassessing Inactive Parents and Parents Unable to Provide a Safe Home When Parental Rights Have Not Been Terminated; and

  •  ensure contact between the parents, the child, and the caseworker.

See also 6200 Case Planning for Permanency, 6250 Permanency Planning Meetings and 5570 Mediation and Other Forms of Dispute Resolution.

6361 Assessing Parental Involvement and Participation in Service Planning

CPS February 2017

When CPS is appointed as permanent managing conservator without termination of parental rights, the caseworker must assess each parent’s involvement and participation in service planning. The assessment must include a discussion with each parent about the parent’s:

  •  desire for family reunification with the child;

  •  progress in services listed on the Family Plan of Service;

  •  level of interest in maintaining contact with the child; and

  •  willingness to sign a relinquishment of parental rights.

The caseworker must:

  •  document the assessment in the monthly narrative and evaluation during the month it took place; and

  •  report the assessment to the court through the court report submitted for the Permanency Hearings After Final Order.

See 6330 The Family Strengths and Needs Assessment (FSNA).

6362 Maintaining the Family Substitute Care Stage

CPS February 2017

The family substitute care (FSU) stage must remain open in IMPACT when DPFS is appointed as permanent managing conservator without termination of parental rights, unless the determination is made that services can be discontinued in accordance with 6365 Reassessing Inactive Parents and Parents Unable to Provide a Safe Home When Parental Rights Have Not Been Terminated.

6363 Court’s Authority to Order CPS to Provide Services

CPS February 2017

When CPS is named as permanent managing conservator and parental rights are not terminated, the court may order CPS to continue to provide services to the parent for up to six months.

Texas Family Code §263.5031(3)(b)

6364 When to Complete a Family Plan of Service

CPS February 2017

Service Planning for the Parents

The caseworker must continue service planning with the parents in all cases for a minimum of six months after CPS is named as permanent managing conservator when parental rights have not been terminated.

The caseworker must conduct a review of the case within 30 days of the court naming CPS as permanent managing conservator, and before the development of the new Family Plan of Service. The review must include the caseworker, supervisor, and program director. During the review, staff must discuss:

  •  the appropriateness of the permanency goals;

  •  the caregiver’s interest or willingness to accept permanent managing conservatorship (PMC);

  •  services needed to address current dangers and the parents’ ability to provide safety over time;

  •  efforts to identify, locate, and notify relatives and kinship; and

  •  efforts to incorporate relatives and kinship into the child’s service planning.

The caseworker must update the Family Plan of Service within 45 days of the court naming CPS as the permanent managing conservator.

After the initial six months, the caseworker must review and update the Family Plan of Service every six months, when:

  •  family reunification continues to be a permanency goal;

  •  CPS is likely to pursue termination of parental rights in the future;

  •  the parent requires services that are not child-specific (for example, the parent will attend therapy to learn how to appropriately manage his or her depression); or

  •  siblings remain in the home and the parents request CPS to provide services to those children.

When none of the above situations exists, staff may determine that a Family Plan of Service is no longer required. See 6365 Determining Whether to Discontinue the Family Plan of Service.

Content of the Family Plan of Service

See 6242.5 Content of the Family Plan of Service.

6365 Reassessing Inactive Parents and Parents Unable to Provide a Safe Home When Parental Rights Have Not Been Terminated

CPS February 2017

The caseworker must reassess the case to determine whether pursuing termination of parental rights is in the best interest of the child or if it is appropriate to discontinue service planning. These actions may be appropriate if the parents:

  •  are inactive in the child’s life;

  •  have not remained in contact with CPS and cannot be located despite concerted efforts;

  •  demonstrate a lack of interest in the child;

  •  do not complete services in the Family Plan of Service; or

  •  are unable to provide a safe home for the child to return to.

Discussion with the Parents

Active service planning continues for a minimum of six months following entry of the final order.

The caseworker must attempt to meet with the parents to:

  •  ask about the lack of participation and interest in the case;

  •  determine whether parents’ circumstances have changed;

  •  discuss the permanency goal and best interest of the child;

  •  gain current information to complete an FSNA; and

  •  discuss the parents’ willingness to sign a relinquishment of parental rights.

Consultation with the Attorney Representing CPS

The caseworker and supervisor must:

  •  review the permanency goals to determine whether goals remain appropriate;

  •  consult with the attorney representing CPS six months after CPS is named as permanent managing conservator without termination of parental rights, and when circumstances of the case change, to determine whether grounds for termination exist or can be established (see Texas Family Code §263.5031(3)(D)). The attorney, caseworker, and supervisor discuss whether the child can be returned to the parent or placed with a relative or fictive kin, or if CPS should pursue termination of parental rights. The caseworker and supervisor reach a decision, based on the attorney’s advice.

If CPS has exhausted all reasonable efforts to engage the parent, and the parent clearly does not wish to participate in case planning or visitation with the child, CPS may discontinue case planning with the parent.

The program director must conduct case consultation and approve before the caseworker discontinues case planning for the parent.

If approved, the caseworker closes the family substitute care (FSU) stage of service in IMPACT if both parents meet these criteria and the program director gives approval.

6366 When Service Planning Has Been Discontinued or Resumed

CPS August 2017

The caseworker must contact the parent annually to update the parent about the child’s status and gather information on the parent’s current circumstances.

The caseworker must inform the parent that contact, plans for services, or both, may resume if the parent contacts DFPS and requests it. Upon notice from the parent, DFPS resumes planning for services.

The caseworker must complete a Family Strengths and Needs Assessment and a Family Plan of Service within 30 days of the parent notifying DFPS he or she is interested in resuming contact and planning for services. Before contact between the parent and child resumes, the caseworker must determine the impact upon the child or youth’s safety and well-being.

The program director must approve discontinuing or resuming visits, if these actions do not violate any court orders, and must review the status annually. The caseworker must document the program director’s review and approval in the case record in the monthly evaluation when the review is due.

6370 When a Mother in an Open CVS Case is Pregnant

CPS October 2017

When a CVS caseworker learns that a mother in an open CVS case is pregnant, the caseworker must:

  •   immediately notify the supervisor; and

  •   staff with the supervisor at least once a month to determine:

  •   whether any safety threats exist that would require making a report to Statewide Intake once the child is born; and

  •   what steps need to be taken when the caseworker learns that the mother is in the hospital or delivered the baby.

Two months before the expected birth date, the CVS caseworker must invite an Investigations program director (PD) or designee to discuss the case if the CVS caseworker determines there are active danger indicators, such as the mother’s use of drugs or alcohol. Topics of discussion at this meeting should include:

  •   concerns for the unborn child;

  •   the family’s ability to ensure the safety and well-being of the child;

  •   possible placement options for the newborn; and

  •   details of the current conservatorship case.

6371 When the Baby is Born

CPS October 2017

When the child is born, if the CVS caseworker determines that there are active safety threats to the child, the CVS caseworker must immediately:

  •   call Statewide Intake to initiate a new intake; and

  •   notify the Investigations program director or designee in the region where the mother is located.

During the investigation, the CVS caseworker must work closely with the Investigations caseworker to provide information and assist as necessary.

6371.1 Legal Intervention

CPS October 2017

The Investigations caseworker must coordinate a legal staffing to determine if an open CVS case involving a pregnant mother’s unborn child warrants a removal when the baby is born.

The following people must attend:

  •   The DFPS attorney.

  •   The Investigations supervisor and caseworker.

  •   The CVS supervisor and caseworker.

If there is disagreement between Investigations and CVS staff about the appropriate course of action, the disagreement must be escalated up the chain of command and resolved.

Under no circumstances should Investigations or CVS representatives make conflicting recommendations to a court. A unified DFPS response must be determined before any court hearing.

Removal Affidavit

To prepare for a removal:

  •   the CVS caseworker must prepare content for an affidavit that details the previous case history and the progress of the current open conservatorship case; and

  •   the Investigations caseworker must prepare content for an affidavit that details the current investigation.

Local court procedures dictate whether single or separate affidavits must be filed for the child’s removal.

If removal is warranted, the Investigation caseworker is responsible for coordinating all placement needs of the newborn child, after consulting with the CVS caseworker regarding possible placement options.

6380 Parental Child Safety Placements in CVS Cases

CPS October 2017

A parental child safety placement (PCSP) is a temporary out-of-home placement made by a parent when CPS determines that the child is not safe remaining in his or her own home. CPS may offer the parents the option of placing the child out of the home as an alternative to DFPS petitioning for court-ordered removal of the child (see 3210 Parental Child Safety Placement).

A PCSP may occur in a CVS case in very limited circumstances. This could include when:

  •   a child is born to a parent who currently has children in an open CVS case but the new child can safely be placed in a PCSP;

  •   it is determined after an investigation that some of the siblings can be placed in a PCSP while the other siblings must be placed in substitute care (this should only occur in very limited situations);

  •   there is a current open CVS case for some siblings while other siblings are in the home and a new investigation warrants a PCSP; or

  •   there is currently an open CVS case for some siblings while other siblings are simultaneously in a PCSP.

If a PCSP is considered during an investigation related to an open CVS case, both the Investigations program director and the CVS program director must approve the PCSP before it is implemented.

A PCSP initiated in the CVS stage of service will be a very rare occurrence since a PCSP can only be used for a child who is not in the conservatorship of DFPS. However, if it is needed, see 3211 Evaluating the Child’s Safety Before Placement and its sub-items.

Although DFPS does not have conservatorship of the child in the PCSP, that child is a member of the family unit. As such, the child must be seen face-to-face each month, and must be included in the parent’s family plan of service, just like a child who remains in the home with the parent.

See:

6242 The Family Plan of Service (FPOS)

3210 Parental Child Safety Placement (PCSP)

If the child is in a PCSP that crosses county or regional boundaries, the primary caseworker for the case must arrange for the child and caregiver to be seen monthly by requesting courtesy supervision (see 6412 Responsibility for Contact Across Regional Lines). If there is more than one child in a PCSP, the primary caseworker is responsible for coordinating monthly face-to-face contact for each of the children.

See also:

3216 Extending a PCSP Past 60 Days

3217 Ending a PCSP

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